Social Studies

Social Studies

As a knowledgeable and ethically grounded citizen, the Marist graduate will demonstrate sound social decision making by utilizing the values, principles, and moral tradition of Marist School. The social studies student will respect and have information about diverse socioeconomic, political and cultural systems. Additionally, the graduate will demonstrate personal responsibility and self-discipline by making informed and morally based decisions. Through the critical assessment of information and mastery of higher thinking skills, the graduate will understand and appreciate the complexity of an interdependent global community. Finally, the graduate will possess the skills and values necessary for lifelong social awareness and political participation.

Courses

List of 18 items.

  • Geography 101 (SS101: Grade 7)

    This two-term course is concerned with the spatial relationship between people and places on the earth. The course focuses on maps, landscapes, climates, vegetation, population, culture, and resource use in an examination of world regions.
  • Ancient Civilizations (SS201: Grade 8)

    This one-term course is an introduction to the study of history. Students will explore historical methods and learn social studies skills. Included in this survey will be the earliest beginnings of civilization, the four river valley civilizations, and Pre-Columbian America.
  • World History (SS301: Grade 9)

    This three-term survey course examines the political, social, religious, economic, and cultural development of humanity. Major topics include the rise and contributions of classical and medieval societies, the Renaissance and Reformation, the rise of nation-states, the Age of Exploration, the Age of Revolution and Reaction, the Industrial Revolution, the Age of Imperialism, the World Wars, the emergence of independent nations in Africa, the Middle East and Asia, and the growing sense of global interdependence.
  • United States History (SS401: Grade 10)

    This three-term survey course is an examination of United States history from the discovery of the New World to the present. Particular emphasis is given to colonial society, the revolutionary era, the writing of the Constitution, the Federalist era, the formation of political parties, nationalism, and Jacksonian democracy. A close examination is given to the issue of slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction, industrialism, urbanization, Imperialism, political and social reform movements, economic challenges, America at war, the Cold War, and America of the twenty-first century.
  • United States Government (SS501: Grade 11*-12)

    This one-term course is a survey of the structure and organization of the government of the United States. Focus is on the institutions of government, citizen participation, and policy development. Research is required.

    *Eleventh grade students with permission of the instructor.
  • Economics (SS502: Grade 11*-12)

    This one-term course is an introduction to the market system including concepts in microeconomics and macroeconomics. Emphasis is placed upon the components of the economy, the factors responsible for production, the role of government, business, and international trade. Research is required.

    *Eleventh grade students with permission of the instructor.

     
  • African Development: Colonization-Modernity (SS460: Grades 10-12)

    This one-term course is offered to students who have completed World History. This course will examine pre-colonial African history, colonization, and Africa’s transition to modern times. We will investigate the rise of African empires, their interaction with Europe, survival under colonization, and struggle for freedom. This course will also explore challenges the African continent faces in their transition to modernity. Themes of study include: justifications and strategies for colonization, the power dynamics between the colonizer and the colonized, the struggle for freedom, and the balance between tradition and modernity.

    Prerequisite: World History (SS301) or AP World History (SS941)
  • Contemporary U.S. and the Developing World (SS551: Grade 11)

    The first of this three-term course will focus on the political, economic, and the social/cultural factors that shape our world. This course will explore current issues confronting both the United States and the developing world, and this course will promote an understanding and appreciation for the complexity of an interdependent global community. Students will learn and utilize research, writing, and rhetorical skills in an examination of pertinent primary and secondary sources.
  • History and the Holocaust (SS543: Grades 10-12)

    This one-term course traces the evolution of the Holocaust from Hitler’s rise to power until the end of World War II. It examines the geography of the Holocaust, Jewish responses to persecution, international responses, and the aftermath and recovery of Jews in Europe after 1945. The legacy of the Holocaust is analyzed in light of other 20th century incidents of genocide and the modern world’s responses to them.
  • The History of Civil Rights in the United States (SS470: Grades 11-12)

    Students will study the history of Civil Rights in the United States, with special emphasis on the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s and 1960s, as well as the sources of civil and voting rights in philosophy and religious tradition, including Catholic social teaching. The course will explore the relationship between civil rights and the African-American experience, as well as women’s rights, Native American rights, and other minority rights and interests in the context of United States history and “lived” historical events.
  • Leadership and Society (SS441: Grades 10-12)

    This one-term course will probe the meaning and content of leadership through readings from literature; readings and research in the field of leadership; analysis of case studies; discussions with visiting business, non-profit, political, religious, and student leaders; the writing of brief analyses; and participation in a larger group project examining particular aspects of leadership.

    Permission of the instructor is required.
  • The Modern Middle East (SS541: Grade 12)

    This one-term course is an examination of the politics, economics, religions, and cultures of the modern Middle East. Particular attention is paid to the Arab-Israeli conflict, the events in the Persian Gulf, the rise of Islamic fundamentalism, and the interest and involvement of the United States in the region.

    Permission of the instructor is required.
  • The Philosophy & Psychology of Happiness (SS547: Grade 10-12)

    This one-term course is an interdisciplinary study, based on methods of inquiry found in philosophy, history, psychology and economics, of how cultures define the concept of happiness and the methods of its acquisition. In addition to studying classical and contemporary philosophers of various cultures and religious traditions, an examination of current neuroscience and its explanations for the experience of happiness will be analyzed. Current economic theories including happiness in policy and personal decision-making will supplement the application of historical interpretations of happiness to current problems in today’s world.
  • AP Economics (SS935: Grades 11-12)

    This course is designed to reflect two college-level introductory economics courses as well as preparation for the Advanced Placement Micro and Macroeconomics Examinations in May. In addition to the fundamental concepts of scarcity and opportunity cost, the macroeconomics portion of the course places emphasis on the study of national income and price determination, economic performance measures and international economics while microeconomics focuses on supply and demand functions as a tool of analysis in a market economy with varying market structures. The Advanced Placement (AP) Examinations are required in May (fee to be announced annually).

    Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. This course fulfills the Economics graduation requirement.
  • AP European History (SS901: Grades 10-12)

    This three-term course is designed to provide a college-level experience and preparation for the Advanced Placement (AP) Examination in May. An emphasis is placed on interpreting documents, mastering quantitative historical techniques, and writing historical essays. Topics include the Renaissance, Reformation, the religious wars of the 16th and 17th centuries, the establishment of Western European leadership, the struggle for wealth and empire, the scientific and intellectual revolutions, and the changes of the European order into the twenty-first century. The Advanced Placement (AP) Examination is required in May (fee to be announced annually).

    Prerequisite: World History (SS301). Permission of the instructor is required.
  • AP United States Government and Politics (SS9211: Grade 11-12)

    This two-term course is designed to provide a college-level experience and preparation for the Advanced Placement Examination in May. An emphasis is placed on interpreting documents and statistics, analysis of political theory, and writing analytical essays. The topics that will be covered include constitutional underpinnings of the United States government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties and interest groups, institutions of the national government, and civil rights and liberties. The Advanced Placement Examination is required in May (fee to be announced annually).

    This course fulfills the United States Government graduation requirement.

    Prerequisite: United States History (SS401). Permission of the instructor is required. It is recommended that students complete United States Government (SS501) or Advanced Placement United States History (SS911) before taking this course.
  • AP United States History (SS911: Grades 11-12)

    This three-term course is designed to provide a college-level experience and preparation for the Advanced Placement Examination in May. An emphasis is placed on interpreting documents, mastering quantitative historical techniques, and writing historical essays. Topics include life and thought in colonial America, revolutionary ideology, constitutional development, Jeffersonian and Jacksonian democracy, abolitionism, and Manifest Destiny. Other topics include the Civil War and Reconstruction, industrialism, populism, progressivism, World War I, the Jazz Age, the Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, and postwar problems. Research work is required. The Advanced Placement (AP) Examination is required in May (fee to be announced annually).

    This course fulfills the United States History graduation requirement.

    Prerequisites: United States History (SS401) except for students who have taken Advanced Placement European History in the tenth grade. Permission of the instructor is required.
  • AP World History (SS941: Grades 9-12)

    This three-term course is designed to provide a college-level experience and preparation for the Advanced Placement (AP) Examination in May. The purpose of this course is to develop a greater understanding of the development of human societies in each major region of the world over the course of five different time periods. As the world becomes more globally interdependent and as developing nations play an ever-larger role in international affairs, students need the broader understanding of the world at large provided by this course. The Advanced Placement (AP) Examination is required in May (fee to be announced annually).

Social Studies Department

List of 13 members.

Marist School

3790 Ashford Dunwoody Road, NE
Atlanta, GA 30319-1899
(770) 457-7201
An Independent Catholic School of the Marist Fathers and Brothers