Modern & Classical Languages

Modern & Classical Languages

The demanding process of mastering the four skills of a language: listening, speaking, reading, and writing, encourages personal discipline and cooperative learning. The struggle to understand and express ideas in a non-native tongue encourages risk-taking, self-awareness, patience, a sense of humor, sympathy, and tolerance. Students will comprehend, analyze, and respond to texts and experiences in a creative and reflective way, gaining a critical perspective on their own culture in relation to other cultures. The study of a non-native language is fundamental to Marist students' life long endeavor to understand, evaluate, and fulfill, in word and deed, their responsibility to the world community and to value the dignity and integrity of all people.

Courses

List of 24 items.

  • Fundamentals of Language (FD101: Grade 7)

    This one-term course will have students asking the fundamental question “what does English share with other languages and what is unique to English?” Course content will have students finding different ways to answer this question and, afterwards, will act as a foundation for future study of other languages, especially those taught at Marist. Students will learn about the fundamental elements of English language structure and words and how they relate to other languages, especially those taught at Marist. Students will work on writing skills in concert with their English class while studying thematic vocabulary with Latin roots. Students will study elements of the history of the English language especially as they relate to other languages.
  • Chinese Language and Culture A (HU410: Grades 9-12)

    This one-term course aims to develop students’ basic understanding of Chinese culture and language with themes and subjects relevant to people’s daily lives. Topics in Chinese A will include introductory personal information, family relationships, animals and pets, traditional Chinese festivals, country/languages and sports. The course will emphasize beginning skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing through a variety of activities and opportunities for student interaction.

    This course counts as an elective, not toward the language graduation requirement.
  • Chinese Language and Culture B (HU510: Grades 9-12)

    This one-term course is designed as a continuation of Chinese A.   Students will expand their vocabulary, understand fundamental grammatical principles, read simple text, use common structural phrases, write short compositions, and hold basic daily conversation.  Various cultural activities are incorporated into the language curriculum.  Topics in Chinese B will include Chinese food, date and time, schooling and housing.

    Prerequisite: Chinese Language and Culture A (HU410). This course counts as an elective, not toward the language graduation requirement.
  • Chinese Language and Culture C: (HU610: Grades 9-12)

    This one-term course is designed as a continuation of the language skills acquired in Chinese A and Chinese B.  Students will increase their proficiency in reading and listening comprehension, conversional production, and writing ability.  Students will leave the course with a broader vocabulary, more effective communication skills, and improved proficiency with typing Chinese characters on computers.  Culture and history studies are integrated into the course to facilitate and supplement learning.  Topics in Chinese C will include Chinese food, clothing, shopping, communications and weather.

    Prerequisite: Chinese Language and Culture B (HU510). This course counts as an elective, not toward the language graduation requirement.
  • French I (FR101)

    This three-term course is an introduction to the study of French. No previous knowledge is expected. Students will learn and practice the four skills necessary to acquire a second language (listening, speaking, reading and writing). Pronunciation, spelling, vocabulary and grammar are taught progressively. Emphasis is placed on the relevance of the language to a student’s own life. Students are encouraged to communicate in French. This course also strives to expand students’ cultural horizons: students learn about the culture of France and of the French-speaking world. They are encouraged to draw parallels and contrasts with their own culture. In addition to the textbook, workbook and the integrated video program, students take advantage of online resources and materials created by the teacher.

    Typically not recommended for 12th grade students.
  • French II (FR201)

    This three-term course begins as a review of basic vocabulary and structure learned in French I. It further develops listening and speaking but emphasizes the grammatical structures underlying both spoken and written French.  Students continue to study the cultures of different areas of the French-speaking world.

    Prerequisite: French I (FR101) or placement exam
  • French III (FR301)

    This three-term course expands the listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills acquired in French I and II using diverse forms of media and technology and extensive pair and group work. Students continue to learn how to express themselves in multiple time frames. Students also begin to study the finer distinctions of language use. Students will deepen their understanding of French and francophone culture through readings, realia, and research.

    Prerequisite: French II (FR201)
  • French IV (FR401)

    This three-term course further develops the four basic skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension). The course is organized around themes (vacations, education, holidays, work, relationships, etc.) through which the study of culture continues. A variety of media such as newspaper articles, short stories, and movies is used in the exploration of these themes. There is a systematic review of grammar, and students learn to write essays in French.

    Prerequisite: French III (FR301). Teacher recommendation is required.
  • AP French Language (FR901)

    This course further develops students’ level of proficiency in interpretive communication (reading, listening), interpersonal communication (writing, speaking) and presentational skills (writing, speaking), and deepens their understanding of the French-speaking world. The course incorporates interdisciplinary topics and addresses the six themes of the AP exam: Global Challenges, Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Personal and Public Identities, Families and Communities, and Beauty and Aesthetics. A variety of authentic audio, visual, and written materials is used including resources from Francophone websites and publications. Classes are conducted exclusively in French. The Advanced Placement (AP) Examination is required in May (fee to be announced annually).

    Prerequisite: French IV (FR401). Teacher recommendation is required.
  • German I (GE101)

    This three-term course is designed to achieve competence in both spoken and written elementary German. Audio-visual materials and an oral/aural approach emphasize listening and speaking skills. Writing in German is developed, encompassing basic grammar structures of the German language. Geography, traditions, and contemporary lifestyles of the German-speaking peoples are presented through accompanying DVD programs and films.

    Typically not recommended for 12th grade students.
  • German II (GE201)

    This three-term course builds on the vocabulary and grammar structures studied in German I. Emphasis continues to be on the development of listening and speaking skills and the study of grammatical structures underlying both spoken and written German. Reading and writing skills are further developed through the use of cultural readings and directed through short compositions. The study of contemporary Austria, Germany, and Switzerland is enhanced through the accompanying DVD program and through films.

    Prerequisite: German I (GE101) or placement exam
  • German III (GE301)

    This three-term course further refines the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing acquired from German I and German II. Authentic German literature is presented which centers around contemporary issues. The readings are supplemented with materials from the internet, recordings, and films. The student reviews and continues the acquisition of grammatical structures for both spoken and written German. In class discussions, oral presentations, and in writing assignments, attention is given to the development of the spoken as well as the written language.

    Prerequisite: German II (GE201)

     
  • German IV (GE401)

    This three-term course further develops the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Through the media of film and original texts students explore topics relating to the culture, literature, history, music, and art of the German speaking countries.

    Prerequisite: German III (GE301). Teacher recommendation is required.
  • AP German Language (GE901)

    This three-term course is designed as an advanced study of German language and culture with the primary objective of preparing students for the AP German Language and Culture Exam in May. Success in the course enables students to communicate proficiently in the German language through three modes: interpretive, presentational, and interpersonal. The course incorporates a variety of authentic materials as well as resources from German websites and publications which are organized around six thematic units: Families and Communities, Contemporary Life, Personal and Public Identities, Science and Technology, Global Challenges and Beauty and Aesthetics. The culture of the German speaking countries is explored in both contemporary and historical contexts. The Advanced Placement (AP) Examination is required in May (fee to be announced annually).

    Prerequisite: German IV (GE401). Teacher recommendation is required.
  • Latin I (LT101)

    This three-term course introduces the fundamentals of the Latin language through lively stories grounded in authentic cultural contexts. Basic vocabulary, pronunciation, and grammar are introduced through translation, recitation, and composition. The study of English words and phrases derived from Latin is an integral component of the course.

    Typically not recommended for 12th grade students.
  • Latin II (LT201)

    This three-term course further develops the vocabulary and reading skills gained in Latin I. The continuous story line springs from the cultural, political, and historical context of the early Roman Empire. Students read and analyze increasingly challenging passages concerning Rome and the provinces. Latin composition and the study of English words derived from Latin, with a particular focus on bases and prefixes, are integral components of the course. Students research in depth some aspect of Roman culture.

    Prerequisite: Latin I (LT101) or placement exam
  • Latin III (LT301)

    This three-term course further refines the student’s grasp of the Latin language through readings and recitations of passages from Latin authors such as Martial, Catullus, Ovid, and Vergil. In addition to continued practice in grammar and composition, students learn how to analyze modified and authentic texts within their cultural, historical, political, and literary context. Each student will investigate one author in depth.

    Prerequisite: Latin II (LT201) or placement exam
  • Latin IV

    This three-term course further develops the experienced student’s ability to read and interpret authentic Latin texts in such areas as mythology, medieval literature, and history. Topics, readings, and projects vary year to year. Students will create a portfolio of best work, which will include recordings, essays, and projects.

    Prerequisite: Latin III (LT301). Teacher recommendation is required.
  • AP Latin Vergil and Caesar (LT903)

    This three-term course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Examination in Vergil and Caesar. Students translate, analyze, discuss, and interpret selected passages from Vergil’s epic, the Aeneid, and Julius Caesar’s commentaries, De Bello Gallico. Students investigate the literary and political context of each work. A basic knowledge of Greek and Roman mythology is assumed, including the events and characters featured in Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey. The Advanced Placement (AP) Examination is required in May (fee to be announced annually).

    Prerequisite: Latin III (LT301). Teacher recommendation is required.
  • Spanish I (SP101)

    This three-term course is designed to introduce Spanish linguistic competency in four key areas: listening, reading, speaking and writing. Additionally, the course builds cultural awareness of Spanish-speaking nations and people throughout the world.  The grammatical concepts presented in this course provide students the opportunity to develop the ability to narrate in the present.

    Typically not recommended for 12th grade students.
  • Spanish II (SP201)

    This three-term course is a review of basic vocabulary and grammatical structures learned in Spanish I. There is further development of listening, reading, speaking and writing skills through an oral/aural/visual approach. The grammatical concepts presented in this course provide students the opportunity to develop the ability to narrate in the past. Contemporary Spanish culture and history are presented through videos, readings, and Spanish realia from the internet.

    Prerequisite: Spanish I (SP101) or placement exam

     
  • Spanish III (SP301)

    This three-term course expands the listening, reading, speaking and writing skills acquired in the previous two years of Spanish through the use of a variety of oral/aural activities such as listening to taped recordings of conversational Spanish, directed question and answer drills, and dialogue presentations. The grammatical concepts presented in this course provide students the opportunity to refine their linguistic competency as well as develop the ability to narrate using the subjunctive.  Videos and readings about Hispanic culture and history, presented in Spanish, help to enhance vocabulary. Students are expected to speak Spanish in class.
     
    Prerequisite: Spanish II (SP201)
  • Spanish IV (SP401)

    This three-term course more thoroughly integrates the four skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking in a culture and conversation format. Students participate in in-class discussions, make oral presentations, listen to authentic recordings and write reports and journals in Spanish based on original texts related to Spanish and Latin American culture, civilization, literature, and art. This course is designed as pre-AP course focusing on the AP themes in each unit along with current events in the Spanish-speaking world.

    Prerequisite: Spanish III (SP301). Teacher recommendation is required.
  • AP Spanish Language (SP901)

    This three-term course is designed to prepare qualified students to take the Advanced Placement Examination in Spanish. It is comparable in scope and in content to a third-year college advanced Spanish composition and conversation course. A high degree of competency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing is enhanced through recording on laptops, oral reports, dramatized presentations, correct use of grammar, creative compositions, and readings in culture and literature. Advanced Placement (AP) Examination is required in May. The Advanced Placement (AP) Examination is required in May (fee to be announced annually).

    Prerequisite: Spanish IV (SP401). Teacher recommendation is required.

Modern and Classical Languages Department

List of 10 members.

Marist School

3790 Ashford Dunwoody Road, NE
Atlanta, GA 30319-1899
(770) 457-7201
An Independent Catholic School of the Marist Fathers and Brothers